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in our privacy series. we are looking at privacy issues and telecommunications policy. joining us from mount view, california, is yahoo!'s cheap of privacy, anne toth. also with us, juliana grunewald. thank you for being with us from california. what is your job at yahoo!? >> i am the vice president of global policy and the head of privacy at yahoo! that means i work with product teams, marketing, customer care, a work throughout the organization to make sure our policies and privacy promises are embedded throughout policies and products. >> this is what you had to say about yahoo!'s privacy policy. >> is this a new policy that yahoo! has developed, and is it one of the more stringent ones in your world? >> our policies have been in evolution over time. i think our thinking about privacy from the beginning. i have been a guy who for 12 years and i have worked with product people to make sure that privacy is reflected through our products services. that is absolutely nothing new. the way we have been thinking about privacy lately has been about how to contextualize privacy so that it ha
then anthony placido of the dea on u.s. drug enforcement and intelligence gathering. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> over the last two years that has meant taking on powerful interests. powerful interests who have been dominating the agenda in washington for a very long time but they are not always happy with me. they talk about me like a dog. [applause] that is not in my prepared remarks -- but it is true. remarks -- but it is true. host: president obama kicking off the midterm elections with his remarks, prepared an otherwise yesterday in milwaukee, a state that he won in 2008 and where a number of key congressional races are shaping up. it is back to work today following the labor day weekend. the president is in washington. congress returns next week. some of the headlines this september 7. "the new york times" -- once a dynamo, they tech sector slow to hire. and tomorrow obama to push tax breaks for businesses. and the business s
this together on such short notice. for those of us who are jews, , some jewish we know what it is like when people have attacked us verbally, attacked us physically and others remained silent. it tcjhhn>'n, americaw"# in 2010 without the response of the religious community. we speak out because we know that hate crimes and hate speech are not mere acts of disreputableiv! assaults or arsons or derivative their attacks on the pillars of the public and the guarantors of our freedom. betrayalo >> what an honor and privilege is for me having stood on the mall for years ago under similar circumstances where we were talking about liberty and justice for all. the statement that we have worked together collectively reads the sleeve. religious leaders denounced anti- muslim bigotry, call for america's respect for tradition a religious liberty. as religious leaders in this great country we have come together in our nation's capital to denounce categorically the derision, misinformation, and outright bigotry being directed against america's muslim community. we bear a sacred responsibility to honor ame
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
the u.s. has blundrd into the scenario with one overreaction or another. bin laden needs to be the object of our hoss tilts, national security and contempt and deserves to be taken seriously. but most of what he has achieved we do ourselves. bin laden does not deserve that we even inadvertently fuffleful unimagined dreams. here's more from the president friday at this news conference. i think in this day and age there is always going to be the potential for an individual or a small group of individuals, if they are willing to die, to kill other people. some of them are going to be very well organized and some of them are going to be random. that threat is there and it's important, i think, for the american people to understand that and not to live in fear. it's just a reality of today's world that there are going to be threats out there. we have i think greatly improved our homeland security security since 9/11 occurred. you know, i am constantly impressed with the dedication that our teams apply to this problem. they are chasing down every threat, not just from al qaeda
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
. this is what you do. you get a cross-section. you use certain techniques. thes is no different than surveys in terms of methodologies that the surveys you read all of the time. if it is our true that our survey does not represent the pulte -- the population, then a new survey does either. regarding the question about civil unions, i think that is a very interesting question. many people say i am opposed to marriage. that conveys and means something different. there is a difference between marriage and a civil union. one difference is a very simple one. if you are married, you are in a different tax rate because you are a married couple. if you are in a civil union you are not. ironically, in many cases not being married is a financially beneficial. ironically, by not allowing same-sex couples to get married we are not getting the same taxes from them that we would get. about the 2% vs. the 98%, it has never been a question of what is the largest percentage of people and just benefiting them. the united states has always been concerned about both those with power and those without power. we
us to the edge with wall street. i keep saying to voters that they need to keep pushing and keep the democrats in their. keep pushing, folks. host: you can join the conversation online, the twittered page is twitter.com/c- spanwj. or you can send us an e-mail and journal@c-span.org. we welcome our listeners that listen to was on radio. this is from the weekend edition of "the wall street journal." host: one final point from her -- "what is the mainstream media getting wrong in getting right? of the media does not appreciate how livid people are with washington." host: by the way, new polls are showing barbara boxer ahead in california. matt dillon says from arlington, texas, good morning, welcome to "washington journal." caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to comment on how the movement that the tea party has, gosh, we are just tired all the losses and misplaced promises that the people always seem to give us. we had a grassroots movement for everyone. republicans, democrats, and tea party yeariers. this new financial reform bill has nothing to do with that, they
in the afternoon or 10 a.m. in the morning. and nobody is here. and some of us nerds will watch it later on c-span, but we need to pack the hearing them. so that's number one. you need to tell us, kennan, when this is going to happen. number two, there's no real limit, maybe the rules hav changed somewhat in the judiciary committee, and i'm not aware of them, but we need all of these panelists to put their names on testimony to be submitted for the record. right, mr. conyers? we need the black scholars in the nation to route around this and help make any discussion about amending the 14th amendment, to weaken it. radio active and make the discussion about improving the 14th amendment and talking about how the courts have weekend the real intention of the framers of the 14th amendment. we need to get people together to put testimony that mr. coleman can sign his name. it's just li we do in the supreme court. we need friends of the court briefs. we need friends of john conyers, you know, testimony. the other things we need to do is t we need to make sure that peop are made aware that the 14th a
in the white house. >> i think it depends on whether my cubs are playing. it is actually very useful because it can keep track of what is going on. well, politico of course. [laughter] and now google things all the time. but i have many -- most of the news organizations, have on there. i do have a few sports applications on there to keep track of that. one thing i have on their that was a bad mistake is pac-man. i was more time than i should, even in meetings as i am listening to people, doing that. i am breaking my personal records all the time. >> david axelrod, thank you for sitting down with us today. >> we continue our innovation in democracy program by bringing back mike allen from politico for next interview, with epilepsy, the former chairman of the republican national committee, among many positions. your brother. mike allen, thank you. [inaudible] >> i started out by parking cars. >> honest work. >> was in the basement and one of those typical. 18 years later, i was chairman on the top four calling people at home for money for the republican party. in those days, you wanted to make
drag us back to 1970. >> i inkjected -- i injected history into our discussion early on. i have to at least note the two-state solution that is been part of the diplomacy in this conflict since 1937. we're now going on 73 years, and the chances that the two-state solution, in my view, is going to disappear from the lexicon in this conflict any time soon are fairly soon. with that, ladies and gentlemen, let me thank all my panelists for participating in today's event and thank all of you and all of you out in for -- out there for joining us in our discussion. [applause] >> thank you. >> search the term "mid east peace" on line at the c-span library and you will get more than ,000 transcripts including an early mike wallace interview of abba eban. it is washington and the world your way. >> president obama's address to the nation last night in about a half-hour. before that, house minority leader john boehner's speech on troop withdrawals. >> vice president joe biden will attend an exchange in military command ceremony on c-span2. after that, the financial inquigs begins a series
with corporations, lobbyists, or anything. it has to do with us. last year i had a chance to go to iraq. i have been there three times and afghanistan twice. i met with a group of people they voted in iraq for the very first time. they stood in line risking their lives for the right to vote in the election. you know what? if the people of orange beach and gulf shores had to stand in the three-mile long bond to vote, it would not be 24%, it might not even before%. -- the 4%. no one controls your government when the american people take their government back. the best way to do that is to be active. i would give anything -- let's take this coming election, november 2, drive around the streets of orange beach. see how many people have a yard sign in their yard. have a bumper sticker on their car. wear a button to the grocery store. that with all due respect is the best way to keep america on the track we want it to go on. it is not just to say to limit this -- and i agree with you. we need to limit outside influence especially if it is not being reported. but the better ways to make sure that the peopl
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
discontent and focus on social crisis. justice.al "u.s. unemployment stands at 9.6%, with michigan at 13.1%. those who do not have jobs are anxious about losing them and watching their benefits declined. incomes are down, and many people are fighting health care expensive or lacking coverage altogether. for many, retirement seems but a dream. the the union is trying to tap into worker discontent and re- commit itself to broader social and justice issues in an effort to rejuvenate its sunken membership level." in "the new york times" there is an article about anna burger. "after all light and labor, a union leader retires, frustrated. she has dedicated her life to building the labor movement but has in nonetheless grown smaller and weaker. beyond a stepping down debt from of federation represents 5 million union members, she is retiring from her job of 14 years as secretary-treasurer of the powerful service employees international union, representing 2 million janitors and other hospital workers. many women have far too hard a time of balancing jobs and family. she is frustrated that unio
for bankruptcy. and like many of us, in that case, and certainly most of the people in bankruptcy, the porteous were shown to be horrible recordkeepers. and obvious a bad money managers. that's a fairly common trait, by the way, when people declare bankruptcy. they tend to have problems with records in money management. during these discussions, mr. lightfoot proposed the idea that the porteous' file their original bankruptcy petition under the pseudonym or various. let me repeat that. mr. lightfoot proposed that they filed under that name. he has presented testified to that effect. he said it was his idea to avoid embarrassment for the porteous', and for their children. because they didn't want it plastered all over the times they team. the newspaper in 2001 publish weekly names of everyone who sought bankruptcy protection and she was particularly embarrassed by that type of publicity for the family. while most bankrupt defilers enjoy anonymity through this process, and while so many cases, public figures were and are singled out other bankruptcy filings. as public figures yourself, i'm sure y
of the day it is going to be worse than the r&d tax credit. >> thank you for being with us. book is usedky's as a blueprint for bringing about change. >> nicholas von hoffman spent 10 years working for him and writes about his experiences in "radical, a portrait of salt alinsky."l there was an hour-long debate tuesday. political analyst john keller the question of the candidates about the state's budget, health care system, and schools. this is 55 minutes. >> good evening and welcome to the first televised debate between the four candidates for governor of massachusetts. let's meet the candidates and get our debate started. they are republican nominee charlie baker, former ceo of harvard pilgrim health care. the democratic nominee is the incumbent. then kent k. hill and green party jill stein. thank you for being here. there are no opening or closing statements tonight. we have just questions from me and from voters. each candidate gets up to one minute to respond to each question and then we will open it up for free and open debate. let's begin. mr. baker, your name comes first in the alp
give his perspective on the challenges facing u.s. cities and later, steve capt. talks about banking rules for the industry. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." host: good morning. it is friday, september 24, 2010 and you are watching "washington journal" and you can see it is a foggy morning here at the nation's capital. the senate yesterday, they managed to deliver a small business bill to the president. if they decided to delay the tax debate until after the election and on campaign finance, the republicans managed to turn down a movement that would have addressed the citizens united decision for the supreme court. we will be talking about a lot of issues this morning, including the house gop pledge to america. and there will be a discussion of disclosure laws for mortgages. we will begin with a discussion about the baby boom generation there is an article in the atlantic, can the baby boomers ?edeem their generation .. and our numbers are on the screen. we will get to your calls and questions in just a few minutes. let me show you the cover of the "at
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
with your tea party backed candidates? yes and no are the answers. republicans only. you can also e-mail us or send us a tweet. here is a -- "the washington times" this morning. that is the analysis in a "the washington times." from "roll call." also in "roll call" is an analysis. he says a lot of the candidates can be elected but delaware is different. it christina obama's victory effectively ends the party's chances of winning the senate seat long held by joe biden. that is his analysis. on the front page of "washington times" this morning is this story -- and "usa today" lead editorial -- that is how they see it. in "the new york post" -- the tea party gets wild. again, republicans only. we want to hear if you are happy with your tea party-backed candidates. mark -- mike from spartanburg, south carolina. you say no. go ahead. caller: good morning. those are the fringe folks and they are crazy. they can't win, thank god. but there is no plan for what they are going to do once they get there. they want to destroy education, get rid of social security. these folks are crazy. we can't afford
and anger, you are not behind anything that will be prosperous or positive. bringing us a better america where we are not fighting all the time. abraham lincoln even said this. we will falter with them, it will not be an outside force. just look in the mirror. host: all right. independent line, connecticut. caller: a quick comment, it is hard to tell where to party members stand on the issues. if you look at rand hall in kentucky, if you look at the way that they have been constructed and guided, not to speak critically on the issues, it is hard to tell where they stand conservatively. host: going back to "the wall street journal" this morning -- host: also in the papers this morning, an update on the alaska primary, "seeking a way out of the ft." -- out of the ft." -- defeat." host: long island, n.y., republican line. caller: i agree with the editorial. i am as fiscally conservative as you can get, but there is no point in republicans forming a circular firing squad. we need to vote for the people that can vote for the republicans who can win the election and make significant gains in c
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23